Music Reviews
Russkaja

Russkaja

Turbo Polka Party

Napalm Records

This may not be the best time to be a band identified with Russia. Russkaja is an Austrian band founded by vocalist Grigorgij Majazaria, who is originally from Russia, and Ukrainian Dimitrij Miller. The band doesn’t take itself all that seriously. They proclaim their music to be “turbo polka,” a mashup of metal, ska, klezmer, and whatever other flavors fit the song.

The War hangs over everything Slavic like a leaden haze, and on Turbo Polka Party, Russkaja comes out swinging with their position on the conflict on “No Borders.” Grigorgij proclaims “No borders, no wars. We‘re equal, all the same. No nations, no fighting. Just stop this game.” And if that didn’t make it clear, a statement on the band’s website states, “We stand for love, unity, and humanity. The band Russkaja keeps representing peace and we say: Stop the war in Ukraine!” With that out of the way, the band can get on with playing with Slavic clichés and turbo charging the dance floor.

The second song on the album, “Russki Style,” celebrates/mocks the stereotype of the hard drinking, hard partying Russian. That’s what Russkaja is about, after all. It’s party time Slavic Style.

“Senales” incorporates some hip-hop for good measure. You may not imagine that oompah tuba, ska off-beat rhythms, and shredding metal guitars belong together, but when wielded by Russkaja, it just sounds right.

Songs are sung in English, German, Russian, and maybe other languages. I like that they sing in various languages — their home audience doesn‘t speak English as their first language, anyway. Listening to the craziness on Turbo Polka Party makes me want to see Russkaja in person.

Russkaja


Recently on Ink 19...

Joe Jackson

Joe Jackson

Event Reviews

Joe Jackson brought his Two Rounds of Racket tour to the Lincoln Theatre in Washington D.C. on Monday. Bob Pomeroy was in the area and caught the show.

Matías Meyer

Matías Meyer

Interviews

With only a week to go before powerful new feature Louis Riel or Heaven Touches The Earth premieres in the Main Slate at UNAM International Film Festival, Lily and Generoso sat down for an in-depth conversation with the film’s director, Matías Meyer.

Mostly True

Mostly True

Print Reviews

Carl F. Gauze reviews the fascinating Mostly True: The West’s Most Popular Hobo Graffiti Magazine, a chronicle of forgotten outsider subculture.

The Tin Star

The Tin Star

Screen Reviews

Anthony Mann’s gorgeous monochrome western, The Tin Star, may have been shot in black and white, but its themes are never that easily defined.

Flipside

Flipside

Screen Reviews

Charles DJ Deppner finds Flipside to be a vital treatise on mortality, creativity, and purpose, disguised as a quirky documentary about a struggling record store.