Tag: Brand New

Andy Hull & Kevin Devine

Event Reviews

Kevin Devine and Manchester Orchestra’s Andy Hull have joined forces as the gorgeously poetic pop group Bad Books, but fill their recent tour setlists with songs from their collective catalogs. Jen Cray enjoys the music, but yearns for an espresso or two.

Braid

Music Reviews

Frankie Welfare Boy Age 5, The Age of Octeen, Movie Music Vol.1, Movie Music Vol. 2 (Reissues) (Polyvinyl Records). Review by Tim Wardyn.

Brand New

Event Reviews

Brand New and Thrice play the first of a pair of sold-out Orlando dates.

Brand New

Event Reviews

The two-night stint of Brand New and Thrice at Orlando’s House of Blues sold out days in advance. Jen Cray managed to get inside on the closing night.

Brand New

Music Reviews

The Devil and God are Raging Inside Me (Interscope Records/Tiny Evil Records). Review by Tim Wardyn.

Brand New

Music Reviews

Deja Entendu (Triple Crown). Review by Margie Libling.

Rufio

Music Reviews

1985 (Nitro). Review by Margie Libling.

Finch

Music Reviews

What It Is to Burn (Drive-Thru). Review by Margie Libling.

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Joe Jackson

Joe Jackson

Event Reviews

Joe Jackson brought his Two Rounds of Racket tour to the Lincoln Theatre in Washington D.C. on Monday. Bob Pomeroy was in the area and caught the show.

Matías Meyer

Matías Meyer

Interviews

With only a week to go before powerful new feature Louis Riel or Heaven Touches The Earth premieres in the Main Slate at UNAM International Film Festival, Lily and Generoso sat down for an in-depth conversation with the film’s director, Matías Meyer.

Mostly True

Mostly True

Print Reviews

Carl F. Gauze reviews the fascinating Mostly True: The West’s Most Popular Hobo Graffiti Magazine, a chronicle of forgotten outsider subculture.

The Tin Star

The Tin Star

Screen Reviews

Anthony Mann’s gorgeous monochrome western, The Tin Star, may have been shot in black and white, but its themes are never that easily defined.

Flipside

Flipside

Screen Reviews

Charles DJ Deppner finds Flipside to be a vital treatise on mortality, creativity, and purpose, disguised as a quirky documentary about a struggling record store.