Music Reviews
Jackopierce

Jackopierce

Promise of Summer

Foreverything Records

Acoustic duo Jackopierce split in 1997 after ten years together – now they’re back a decade later with a brand new album, and fans of their band’s previous six records will find a lot to like on Promise of Summer.

The trademark harmonies and lilting melodies of Jack O’Neill and Cary Pierce that helped Jackopierce shift 500,000 records are once more in evidence, and fans attracted to the band by signature hit “Vineyard” will no doubt feel nostalgic once more upon hearing the infectious title track and the reworked version of classic JP track “March.”

But with influences ranging from Petty to Mellencamp, it’s not just old-time hardcore Jackopierce fans who will enjoy Promise of Summer. First single “Everything I’m Not” is a jaunty rocker that has “radio hit” written all over it, while the mellow, acoustic-based “Get It Right” demonstrates Cary Pierce’s undoubted songwriting talent and smooth, pure voice. O’Neill assumes vocal duties on another highlight, “I Gotta Know,” and he’s also the main voice on album standouts “Texas” and the quite brilliant “Come On July.”

Since splitting up, Pierce has released solo material and also become an in-demand producer, while O’Neill has also released solo material and tried his hand at acting. Promise of Summer emphatically proves that the duo’s talents are best utilized as a team in Jackopierce; here’s hoping they don’t wait for another decade before releasing the follow-up.

Jackopierce: http://www.jackopierce.com


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