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Music Reviews

Big Star

Big Star

In Space

Omnivore

When In Space came out in 2005, it received a mixed to highly critical response. To be fair, as the first new music under the Big Star banner, it had to live up to both the band’s previous output and the mythology that had grown up around the band in the intervening 30 years. That was an impossibly high bar. Original members Jody Stephens and Alex Chilton were joined by Ken Stringfellow and Jon Auer (aka the Posies). The band had been playing gigs as Big Star for a decade at this point and when they finally went into the studio, it wasn’t with the goal of making any kind of definitive statement. They went into Ardent studios with the goal of working up and recording a song a day, with a few days for overdubs and mixing. That’s a formula very much in keeping with Alex Chilton’s late career working methods, but worlds away from the meticulousness of the original Big Star sessions.

This Omnivore reissue is a chance to reassess In Space for what it is, not what people were hoping it would be. So, the record bombed when it came out. The general consensus was that it was a good Posies album or the best Alex Chilton album in years, but it wasn’t Big Star. Well, should we have expected anything else?

Chilton was infamous at this point for playing whatever he felt like, and you can hear that on In Space. There are well-crafted pop songs that have intricately arranged harmonies in the vein of the Beach Boys (“Turn My Back on the Sun”), songs full of Memphis soul and innuendo (“Do You Want to Make It” “Whole New Thing”) and some raunchy garage rock (“Mine Exclusively). Just to confound things a little more, Alex brought in an arrangement of some pieces by Baroque composer Georg Muffat (“Aria/Largo”). It’s a mélange that perfectly reflects what Chilton (and Stephens and the Posies) had been up to since the end of Big Star’s original run.

If you take the album, as it’s own thing, as a reflection of what the reanimated Big Star was all about, it’s a really enjoyable album. I really like some of the loose and goofy moments. “Love Revolution” is a completely bonkers ’70s R&B rave up. I like the silly revolutionary shout outs for “making it all night long” and “platform shoes.” I am amused by that the Beach Boys harmonies are on a song saying that there is such a thing as too much sun. “February’s Quiet” and “Best Chance” even approach the power pop majesty of Radio City.

Will In Space gain the mythical stature of Radio City or #1 Record? Probably not. Is the record a decent document of four guys who called themselves Big Star having fun in the studio some 30 years after their last recording session? Hell yes.

omnivorerecordings.com

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Music Reviews

Ian Moore

Ian Moore

Toronto

Last Chance Records

To be honest, I had never heard of Ian Moore, but when my editor asked if I would like to review the new six-song EP, Toronto, I figured I’d give it a whirl. It’s a darn good thing my editor knows me ALMOST better than I know myself – this golden nugget may just be the best release of 2018. Moore has worn many musical hats over the course of his career, and these six gems meld the best of the Texas rocker’s diverse sound. Backed by drummer Sekou Lumumba (Bedouin Soundclash, Thornley) and bassist Matt Harris (Oranger, The Posies), Moore co-produced the record with Brian Moncarz.

Opening with a one-two punch, “You Gotta Know” comes screaming out of the gate with a Bowie-flavored, hard-driving guitar/drum infused scorcher followed by “Lords of the Levee,” another robust rocker. “Looking For The Sound,” with its hints of Matthew Sweet and Tom Petty comes next, and it is the perfect setup for “1000 Blackbirds,” a song The Killers easily could have recorded. “Rock N Roll,” another Bowie-esque rocker with subtle specks of Nickelback, is over as quickly as it begins and leaves you wanting more. Rounding it out with the mellower Wallflowers-flavored “Satellite,” the EP is over at lightning speed, and the only thing left to ask is, why isn’t there more, more, Moore?

www.ianmoore.com

Categories
Screen Reviews

Big Star Live In Memphis

Big Star Live In Memphis

Starring Alex Chilton, Jody Stephens, Jon Auer, Ken Stringfellow

Omnivore Recordings

For a band largely and unjustly ignored during their prime, Big Star has become one of the most cited and admired groups 40 years past their formation. The history of Alex Chilton and Big Star is well documented both on record and in print, but little footage of them live has surfaced. Omnivore’s release of Big Star Live In Memphis DVD and adjoining CD/LP goes a long way in righting that. Filmed at the New Daisy Theatre in the bands hometown of Memphis in 1994, this is the only full show that has been found of the band live.

Big Star broke up after 3 albums in 1974. Marred by infighting (which lead to co-founder Chris Bell and bassist Andy Hummel departure before the band’s second abum, Radio City), the band hadn’t performed together in almost 20 years. Chilton and drummer Jody Stephens were joined by Jon Auer, guitar, and Ken Stringfellow on bass from the Posies, and performed in 1993 at a concert at the University of Missouri. The band then started doing shows, and this concert shows, as Stringfellow remarks in the liner notes, “you might even say we were…a band”.

And as the DVD profoundly illustrates, what a band it was. Alex, in his dirty white jacket, starts the evening off with “In The Street” followed by a grinding “Don’t Lie To Me”, and it’s wonderful to witness. Auer and Stringfellow are perfect foils to Chilton, following his lead and taking vocal duties on the Chris Bell numbers such as “I Am The Cosmos”. The band is tight, running through Big Star “hits” such as “Back Of A Car”, “September Gurls” and “The Ballad Of El Goodo” which show both the strength of the band’s writing and the muscle which live performance gives numbers we had previously only heard on record. Chilton cracks his first sly grin during an early cover of The Kinks “Till The End Of The Day”, and the set-list is peppered with more- T. Rex’s “Baby Strange”, Jobim’s “The Girl From Ipanema”, and Todd Rundgren’s “Slut” to end the evening.

But it’s the bands original works that truly allow the band to shine. Hearing songs such as “Don’t Lie To Me” or “Thank You Friends” come to life on-stage is to behold what alchemists Big Star were, creating a genre– power pop–almost single-handedly from elements as disparate as Simon & Garfunkel to the intricate pop of The Beatles, layered in between Chilton’s garage rock/Memphis soul roots. To a multitude of fans around the world, they truly were Big Star(s). Play this thing loud, and you’ll understand why.

omnivorerecordings.com

Categories
Music Reviews

The Posies

The Posies

Blood/Candy

Ryko

It’s been five years since Jon Auer and Ken Stringfellow last got together for a Posies record, 2005’s remarkable comeback Every Kind of Light. But as this consummate power pop band has demonstrated time and again over the course of the last 20 years, a Posies record is always worth the wait. While paying homage to a few musical heroes, getting some stellar assistance on a few tracks, and adventurously breaking some new musical ground, Blood/Candy ultimately sounds like the definitive statement from a band that has had more than its share of high points over the years.

Indeed this record seems to take the best bits of all Posies eras and combine them in a stew that tastes remarkably fresh and alive and full of possibilities. Whether you’re a fan of the impressively ornate popcraft of 1990’s Dear 23, the crunch of 1993’s grunge-era Frosting on the Beater, or the more stripped down sound of 1998’s Success, there is something here for you. There are plenty for fans of The Hollies and Big Star here as well. Auer and Stringfellow previously covered the former and took part in reunion shows with the latter, prior to Alex Chilton’s death earlier this year.

Ever present on Blood/Candy are Auer and Stringfellow’s vocal harmonies that sound as natural as they ever have. They’ve never been in finer voice.

The band, which also includes drummer Darius Minwalla and bassist Matt Harris, also takes plenty of chances on Blood/Candy. The Stringfellow-led “Licenses to Hide,” with guest vocals from Lisa Lobsinger of Broken Social Scene, is an ambitious song suite that brings to mind Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” without the opera references. While somewhat less elaborate, Auer’s “The Glitter Prize,” which features harmony vocals from Kay Hanley of Letters to Cleo, is an equally perfect pop song. Strummed acoustic guitars, pumping bass, a killer chorus and bridge, and the perfect mix of shimmering clarity and crunch all combine to make it an album highlight.

But they’re just getting started. Auer also offers the effortlessly melodic “So Caroline,” the forgetfully nostalgic “Cleopatra Street,” the Crowded House-like “Holiday Hours,” and the weird but wonderful Zombies/ Hollies/ Beach Boys mashup of song styles, “Accidental Architecture.” Stringfellow gets impressive showcases on the dark but driving “Take Care,” the vocal effects-laden “For the Ashes,” and the simply stunning “She’s Coming Down.” He even gets to share the mic with ex-Stranglers frontman Hugh Cornwell on opening track “Plastic Paperbacks.”

Before it’s all over, Auer and Stringfellow also come together on “Notion 99,” for what sounds like the perfect old school Posies song.

But be sure to stick around for the coda to set closer “Enewetak” for a lovely homage to Pet Sounds-era Beach Boys. If it seems like the record’s only too obvious spot-the-influence moment, it’s also the sound of Auer and Stringfellow proclaiming to the world that now they can do anything. And on Blood/Candy, they do. It’s a remarkable step forward for an enduring musical partnership and one of the best records of the year.

The Posies: www.theposies.net

Categories
Music Reviews

Mezzrow

Mezzrow

Mezzrow

With buoyant vocal hooks, breezy guitars and two-fisted drums, Mezzrow breathes life into a stagnant Americana scene. This charming, infectiously energetic young band takes the Byrds’ trademark jangle into British rock territory, a combination of geographic styles that hooks the listener from the first second and mercilessly refuses to stop being catchy.

I warn you now: Mezzrow doesn’t just write songs. Rather, they’re drugs. You will be addicted. This is a group that knows how to craft the perfect pop song, from the British Invasion-meets-country melodies of “Blue & Red” to the Eric Clapton-ish bluesy licks of “Too Many Situations.” The band — consisting of vocalist/guitarist Anthony Bezich, guitarist Fran Tagmire, bassist Mike Schraeger, and drummer Erik Sooy — has intoxicating chemistry. Witness the dueling riffs on “Tear” and how they’re propelled even further by the pounding percussion.

Mezzrow is what the Posies should’ve been but never were. From top to bottom, the material here is so strong that a major-label bidding war should be just around the corner. Seriously. Even when Mezzrow slows the tempo on “Showed Me the Ropes,” the toe-tapping never stops.

Mezzrow: www.mezzrowmusic.com

Categories
Music Reviews

The Posies

The Posies

Every Kind of Light

Ryko

Jon Auer and Ken Stringfellow may not have been able to revive Big Star on last year’s hit and miss “reunion” album, In Space, but from the sounds of Every Kind of Light, their off-again-on-again day job band may be a different story. And if The Posies sound like a new band here, it’s because they are. Auer and Stringfellow are joined by newcomers Matt Harris (Oranger) on bass and Darren Minwalla (Preston School of Industry) on drums. The result is a well-arranged, collaborative effort that showcases not only Auer and Stringfellow’s trademark harmonies but a number of new wrinkles, too.

Cool overlapping vocals highlight opener “It’s Great to Be Here Again,” a choogling, organ-flavored statement of purpose. It’s not, however, a song about how The Posies feel to be back in the saddle. Instead the track is one of two here (the other being set closer “Sweethearts of Rodeo Drive,” with its shout-outs to celebrity Hummer drivers) about rampant consumerism and the corporate culture in America. “Conversations,” which follows, has quickly become one of my all-time favorite Posies songs. Achingly beautiful verses alternate with a repetitive chorus that will stick in your head for days. Give this one a shot and it will really sneak up on you.

Although they allegedly called it quits in 1999, The Posies have continued to tour occasionally and can always be counted on to bring the ear-splitting rock live. “All In A Day’s Work,” which evokes life on the road, is a pounding cruncher that wouldn’t have sounded out of place on 1993’s grunge-era Frosting On the Beater. “There’s only so many chords that haven’t been played yet,” Auer sings. “And the check’s in the mail, but we haven’t been paid yet.” The Stringfellow-fronted “I Guess You’re Right” is another heavy number with interesting guitar effects and an inventive vocal arrangement. And “I Finally Found A Jungle I Like!” is a party anthem par excellence.

More mellow but no less intriguing is “Anything and Everything,” with a lighter-than-air pillow of harmonies like something off a 10CC record. Auer sings about drowning heartbreak in alcohol on the laid-back “Last Crawl.” And “Love Comes,” which could be a hit single in another universe, is pure pop confection with sweet harmonies, a nagging guitar and some terrific piano work.

The record’s only misstep is Stringfellow’s “Could He Treat You Better,” a falsetto, faux-blues number (and cleverly disguised slam of President Bush) that slows the momentum. Nice to hear The Posies try something new, but this one just doesn’t work musically.

Still The Posies mostly rise to the occasion on Every Kind of Light, with a new band, a new sound and an infusion of new creativity. Here’s to hoping they hang around this jungle for as long as they like.

The Posies: www.theposies.net • Ryko: www.rykodisc.com

Categories
Interviews

Alex Woodard

Alex Woodard

From Finance To F# : How Alex Woodard Swapped Math For Music

Ever feel like ditching the suit and tie and kissing a life of corporate drudgery goodbye to follow a dream? Well, that’s exactly what singer-songwriter Alex Woodard did in the mid-1990s when he sacrificed a career in Boston’s finance industry to become a full-time musician, and after the release of his third solo studio album Mile High, it’s clear he hasn’t looked back since a chance meeting with a stranger determined his fate.

“It was someone I met at a party,” Alex explains. “She was years older than me, but she saw something in me that no one else ever had. I was living in Boston and was home in California for Christmas. I hadn’t picked up a guitar in six months, and there was one sitting in the corner at this party, and I started playing and singing to myself. She said to me, “Why aren’t you doing this?” One thing led to another, and that was the genesis of this part of my life.”

It led to the affable California native moving back across country to immerse himself in the burgeoning Seattle music scene and work with like-minded musicians from the likes of Jackopierce, Gigolo Aunts and the Posies. But Woodard’s musical vision from those early days is perhaps best realized on Mile High, his recent self-released collaboration with Pete Droge.

“I had been a fan of Pete’s ever since I moved to Seattle,” Alex admits. “I met him at one of my shows, and we kept in touch. By the time I was ready to do Mile High, I was already living in California again and he was on the road with The Thorns. I mentioned it to him, and he said, “Why don’t I produce it?” So I started sending demos to hotel rooms wherever The Thorns were in Europe, and that’s how it started.”

Mile High is a more organic record than its more polished and electrified predecessors (Woodard’s debut from 2000 Nowhere Near Here and the excellent Saturn Returns from 2002), with the gentle acoustic pop of “Mile High” and the upbeat “Steps” and “Blood, Salt and Silver” mixing effortlessly with achingly beautiful ballads such as “Voice On The Wire” and “Invitation.” The diversity and quality continues with the laid-back, soulful stylings of “Breathing”, and the relaxed environment in which the album was recorded seems to have contributed to its atmosphere.

“It’s funny, I looked at this record as kind of a “living room” recording,” Alex agrees. “Pete and I did the whole album in his house, in-between drinking coffee and playing with my dog, so my expectations weren’t really that high as far as it being a reaction record. Making an organic record was something Pete and I talked about a lot, and it was definitely a recurring mile-marker as we made our way.”

‘I think Pete had a very definite vision about what he wanted this record to be, and he brought that to the table,” he continues. “He’s a great singer/songwriter, and I listened to his thoughts with great intent. Not to mention that he’s a great player, so that presence is really felt on the record too.”

Woodard’s rootsy voice has, in the past, drawn easy comparisons with the likes of Bruce Springsteen and Tom Petty, and it’s on Mile High that such parallels are most clearly evident. While he remains modest in the face of such high praise, he admits he is inspired by the authenticity such greats possess.

“Well, for folks to even mention my name in the same sentence as those guys is so kind,” he says coyly. “Guys like Springsteen and Petty are heroes of mine. I think the comparison stems from a common approach to songwriting and singing. I mean, they don’t have the prettiest voices in the world, and neither do I, but when they sing, it sounds like they mean it. It’s authentic and that kind of everyman vibe can really resonate deep.”

And typically, Woodard has drawn from authentic personal experience for inspiration for the songs on Mile High.

“I’m most proud of “Invitation”,” he tells me. “That’s a song I wrote about my grandmother, as an invitation to heaven, or whatever you call yours. She is still with us, but sometimes it’s as if she is standing at the gate ready to go in. I captured true to myself what I was feeling about the situation, and to me, that is what a good song does.”

“I also am proud of “Voice on the Wire”, because of its simplicity in the moment. That is most people’s favorite song off the record, and I think it’s because it captures this certain moment that most of us have been in at some point.”

That heartfelt simplicity is also captured on a recently-recorded song Woodard wrote as a reaction to the devastating events in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, a contribution that demonstrated the innate benefits of being an indie musician in 2005.

“I wrote a song called “Flooded”, recorded it in my living room, posted it on the website a few minutes later, and people were on it. Soon, music directors in the gulf were picking it up off the website. It shows how the Internet has birthed a wide-open field for artists like me; if you want to get your music out there, you can.”

Proceeds from the song and a couple of benefit shows raised $20,000 for victims of Katrina, and, watching helplessly on TV from the other side of the country, Woodard felt duty-bound to do something to help.

“Music in itself is so healing, and to bring people together with music for a cause bigger than ourselves, well, that’s what it’s all about,” he says emphatically. “If I could do that every night, I would. I ain’t much of a political beast, so I stay away from telling people what to think, but I do think there are a lot of folks out there that need help, and that benefit show with Nickel Creek and me was one small way to do it.”

Being able to make a difference in this way is just one reason why trading the corporate grind for a simpler existence as a singer-songwriter was the right decision for Woodard. With three appearances at acclaimed industry showcase SXSW under his belt, he is ambitious and committed to making good music, but his outlook is grounded: he realizes that a major label deal is not the be-all and end-all for an artist these days.

“When I started doing this years ago, it was all about getting that major label deal,” he reminisces. “I never got one, but that was a blessing in disguise, because it forced me to really develop myself as a songwriter and performer. And that has made a world of difference. At this point, I don’t care about having a deal at all, and that’s usually when they come calling.”

When he’s not touring in support of his music, Woodard spends a lot of his time at his home near the beach just north of San Diego writing with like-minded artists such as Cary Pierce, surfing, or playing with his beloved Labrador dogs Kona and Stella. He’s the first to admit his music has allowed him to live a more idyllic life than he would have been able to in the hustle and bustle of the financial districts of Boston or LA, and even though it’s not always a bed of roses, he certainly has no regrets about his radical career switch.

“You are right, I have worked to build a good life,” he affirms. “But the toughest part of this business is everything everyone doesn’t see, especially as an independent musician. Sometimes the places everyone goes are the loneliest, and the road can be very long. So I try to balance out the work with the things that make me happy – my dogs, surfing, music, family, and service. That’s where the life is, in the balance.”

Alex Woodard: www.alexwoodard.com

Categories
Music Reviews

What Made Milwaukee Famous

What Made Milwaukee Famous

Trying To Never Catch Up

Self Released

This Austin-based quartet is better than their beer commercial name might suggest. Assimilating 80’s new wave, old-school synth sounds and 90’s modern rock, guitarist/vocalist Michael Kingcaid and company deliver an energetic set of tunes, marred only by the amateurish production.

Opener “IDECIDE” moves forward on a spooky Cure-like bass line, over-loud drums and a synth sequencer. New wave-y guitars and distorted vocals make “Mercy, Me” sound a bit like The Strokes. The jangle pop of “Almost Always Never” features soaring falsetto vocals and nice harmonies. “Hellodrama” is catchy, Cars-like pop with a strong vocal performance. “Short on Shields” has impressive vocals as well, but its rinky-dink production detracts from the song’s ability to cast a mood. You get the feeling that the cheesy-sounding “Next to Him” could also have been salvaged with better production.

Elsewhere, the album’s title track has a more expansive, textured sound that recalls 90’s modern rockers like Dishwalla. “Curtains!” seems to be on the right track, though not quite there yet, bringing to mind The Posies and The Dambuilders, among others. The bizarrely-titled “Bldg. A Boat From the Boards In Your Eye” affects a faux party atmosphere with some jaunty harpsichord and trumpet along the way. And “Around the Gills” is a heavy guitar rocker that wanders around a bit too much but picks up steam at certain key points.

Their focus isn’t quite laser sharp and their ambitions often exceed the grasp of their musicianship and production abilities, but What Made Milwaukee Famous show their hearts are clearly in the right place. Give ’em some time, and one day they might have the buzz of 80’s revisionists like Franz Ferdinand, Interpol and The Killers.

What Made Milwaukee Famous: www.whatmademilwaukeefamous.com

Categories
Music Reviews

Graig Markel

Graig Markel

Tall Tales on Tape

Sonic Boom

Although Graig Markel nearly always finds his name footnoted by his earlier grunge project New Sweet Breath, the multi-instrumentalist has long since established himself as a solo act. By now he may even be better known for the three releases under his own name, including The Gospel Project and Hard Grammar, than his collaborative involvement in the Seattle scene of the late 1990s.

Tall Tales on Tape shows a further development in Markel’s sound, a slight drift away from the sensual Prince-influenced bedroom ballads of his previous releases towards the darker, hard-edged, Motown-style rock of The Afghan Whigs. Both the deliciously catchy opener, “The Early Bird Gets By,” and the keyboard-driven (for the most part) following track, “Seasons in the Shroud,” clearly bear this out.

“The Year 3,000 Is Just Ahead,” one of Tall Tales‘ few aberrations, is mawkish and repetitive, better suited for the Dawson’s Creek soundtrack than this otherwise admirable disc. The first verse is constructed out of nonsensical forced rhymes (“The year 3,000 is just ahead/and disco is nearly dead/I won a free trip to Club Med…”), and Markel chose to conclude each chorus with the recommendation to “go and blow your brains out” — though the irony, if it’s intended at all, exerts too great a strain on the lyrics and music. It just sounds silly.

Things are quickly back on track with “Saturday Night Fractures” (hip-thrusting ’70s funk rock) and “Green Eyes,” in which Markel sneaks an overt lyrical reference to New Sweet Breath. The richer, more intricate orchestration that the singer-songwriter appears to have been aiming for is apparent on these two tracks. He brings in bursts of piano, harmonic vocals (his own), feedback and some light digital effects to fill out the songs, subtly enhancing their appeal without it seeming distracting or contrived.

“Wings,” albeit no great deviation from the standard rock style manual, is a great tune, aching and bittersweet, one that I would have liked to have had during a past period of tumultuous relationships. Back then a sad succession of muses I couldn’t live without needed to hear “when you’re mine/I’m blind/and you taste just like apple wine/in springtime,” especially as it’s sung here, with Markel’s sensitive, brooding stress on certain phrases. Unfortunately, the promising but dull “Black and Blue and Numb All Over” is sandwiched between this high point and another good Afghan Whigs-type song, “Water to the Flames.”

Tall Tales on Tape is arguably Markel’s best solo album on account of its consistency and confidence, among other less salient qualities. It’s also one of the better discs to pass through my stereo this year. The most heartening thing about it is that Markel’s songwriting and execution has continually improved over the course of his last four albums, thereby raising listeners’ expectations for a positively first-rate fifth. If he manages to fulfill this tacit promise, it will be worth the wait. Tall Tales will surely tide us over in the meantime.

Graig Markel: www.graigmarkel.com

Categories
Music Reviews

Ted Leo / Pharmacists

Ted Leo / Pharmacists

Tell Balgeary, Balgury is Dead

Lookout!

Ted Leo has long been one of indie rock’s “most likely to,” first with DC new wave punks Chisel, but lately as Ted Leo/Pharmacists. The Tyranny of Distance was one of 2001’s best-kept secrets in indie rock, causing enough of an industry stir to ensure overwhelming attention when Hearts of Oak followed in early 2003, another well-received artistic success.

Tell Balgeary, Balgury is Dead is a 9-track mini-album, and a way to please his most impatient fans until the next “real” album’s out. It’s an unpretentious collection of already available material (the title track), a re-recorded song (“The High Party”), some new and stripped-down solo songs (“The Sword in the Stone,” “Bleeding Powers” and “Loyal to My Sorrowful Country”) and a few cover versions effectively mapping out his musical heritage (The Posies’ “Dirty Old Town,” The Jam’s “Ghosts” and, a tad surprisingly, Split Enz’s “Six Months in a Leaky Boat”).

Ted Leo’s frantic delivery and expressive playing is very much in place, but this release relies more heavily on his lyrics than his musical performance. Tell Balgeary, Balgury is Dead stresses his politically-aware qualities, portraying him as an American counterpart to UK’s Billy Bragg. It’s certainly not a far-fetched comparison, as Ted Leo conjures up images not only of Bragg, but also of Paul Westerberg, a young Paul Weller and even his folkie hero Woody Guthrie.

As an EP to fill the days until his next full-length, this is a fine enough release. The casual nature of the disc doesn’t hold a candle to his last two albums, but even when he’s just messing about, Ted Leo is far more interesting than most current indie rockers. Tell Balgeary, Balgury is Dead is mainly of interest to those familiar with his former work; everyone else should start by checking out The Tyranny of Distance and Hearts of Oak, both of which demonstrate his true capacities as songwriter and performer.

Lookout! Records: http://www.lookoutrecords.com/