Tag: Motörhead

Band Vs. Brand

Band Vs. Brand

Screen Reviews

When does a band become a brand? This new documentary examines the current state of the music business and reveals how the “brand” of a rock group now has more power than the members themselves.

R.I.P.

Music Reviews

Street Reaper (Brave in the Grave). Review by Bob Pomeroy.

Geezër

Geezër

Event Reviews

Geezër brought their old-school show all the way from their Miami rest home, and Julius C. Lacking thinks they were quite spry.

Motörhead

Event Reviews

It was a night of metal and moshing in the sold-out House of Blues, with Motörhead and Anthrax in town. Carl F Gauze elbowed his way through the madness.

Killing Joke

Music Reviews

Absolute Dissent (Spinefarm/Universal). Review by Matthew Moyer.

Motorhead in the Studio

Motorhead in the Studio

Print Reviews

How does one make a book about Motorhead, hard-drugging and hard-thrashing metal godfathers, boring? Read on…

The Fall

Music Reviews

Your Future Our Clutter (Domino). Review by Matthew Moyer.

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Greg Hoy

Greg Hoy

Interviews

Fascinated by the arcane world of musical gear, Randy Radic spoke with dyed-in-the-wool gearhead Greg Hoy about his setup on new EP Holy Mother of God, how he produces his unique sound, and a gear-gone-wrong moment.

Joe Jackson

Joe Jackson

Event Reviews

Joe Jackson brought his Two Rounds of Racket tour to the Lincoln Theatre in Washington D.C. on Monday. Bob Pomeroy was in the area and caught the show.

Matías Meyer

Matías Meyer

Interviews

With only a week to go before powerful new feature Louis Riel or Heaven Touches The Earth premieres in the Main Slate at UNAM International Film Festival, Lily and Generoso sat down for an in-depth conversation with the film’s director, Matías Meyer.

Mostly True

Mostly True

Print Reviews

Carl F. Gauze reviews the fascinating Mostly True: The West’s Most Popular Hobo Graffiti Magazine, a chronicle of forgotten outsider subculture.

The Tin Star

The Tin Star

Screen Reviews

Anthony Mann’s gorgeous monochrome western, The Tin Star, may have been shot in black and white, but its themes are never that easily defined.