• ZE Records

    ZE Records

    Kicking off Ink 19‘s new series, Labels We Love, S D Green talks to ZE Records co-founder Michel Esteban about defining a sound and establishing a label during New York’s 1970s creative zeitgeist, and the resurrection of the label that was once home to Lydia Lunch, Suicide, and Kid Creole & the Coconuts.

  • Juba Dance: Ben Lamar

    Juba Dance: Ben Lamar

    S D Green catches up with the sensational Ben Lamar from hip-hop-blues-brazilian band Juba Dance to discuss how fruit can be music, and how porpoises can be clever.

  • Animal Collective

    Animal Collective

    Animal Collective put the hip-pie in hip-ster, so why was the Orlando audience so ornery? S D Green ponders the lack of love at the concluding date of the band’s recent tour with Black Dice.

  • Modest Mouse

    Modest Mouse

    Modest Mouse are playing bigger and bigger gigs these days. Their recent sold out show at Orlando’s House of Blues is an example. S D Green questions their modesty in light of all this popularity and new personnel.

  • Dr. Dog

    Dr. Dog

    Dr. Dog‘s recent concert at Orlando’s Social conjures up both Frampton Comes Alive and Flavor of Love for S D Green. Believe it or not, this is a good thing.

  • White Denim

    White Denim

    S D Green sits down (in front of a computer) and chats with (emails) White Denim bassist Steve Terebecki. What follows is a conversation about their new album Fits, opening for ABBA, and Thomas Jefferson. Kind of.

  • Watchmen

    Watchmen

    Zack Snyder‘s cinematic version of Alan Moore‘s ground breaking graphic novel is about to hit theaters. Moore wants nothing to do with it. S D Green offers a review of the source material that proved a landmark moment in comic book history, and that has many fans divided about the upcoming adaptation.

  • Ron MacLean

    Ron MacLean

    Ron MacLean weaves a dream-like reality, exploring detachment and loss in his short story collection Why the Long Face?. S D Green conducts an unconventional interview with the author exploring, in part, technology’s impact on human interaction and contemporary literature. Does it work? You be the judge.

  • The Rumble Strips

    The Rumble Strips

    U.K. act Rumble Strips may have brought the rain, but their neo-ska tunes were all sunshine and big puffy “Clouds.” S D Green slogged through the downpour to catch a glimpse of the surprising source for Charlie Waller‘s big, big voice.

  • Pop Levi

    Pop Levi

    How do you dethrone the “King of Pop”? Let the current king disappear to Bahrain and get sued for $7 million by an Arab sheik; take your kaleidoscopic and playful songs to California’s Westlake Studios where Michael Jackson recorded Thriller; or simply be a boy named Pop. Pop Levi goes 2 of 3 and emerges with Never Never Love, an album shot through with the ghosts of Prince, MJ, and R. Kelly. S D Green and the musical shape-shifter talk the process of Pop.

  • Zaki Ibrahim

    Zaki Ibrahim

    Operating in a genre dominated by paint-by-numbers R&B, Zaki Ibrahim paints soul — outside the lines — with a purple paint brush. S D Green talks to the emergent Canadian soulstress about globalism in her sound, the unlikely influence of Tom Waits, and why critics refuse to believe Canadian artists have soul.

  • Kites

    Kites

    With material co-credited to Paul McCartney, Jean-Philip Grobler‘s Kites has caught the attention of music industry luminaries. However, he’s intent to make music his way, in his own time, resulting in his current EP You and I in the Kaleidoscope. Three years to make an EP? Grobler talks about that misconception, and promises his next shot of arena rock won’t take so long, but warns it might include a full orchestra in St. Paul’s Cathedral. S D Green tries to harmonize with the former South African choirboy.

  • Neil Hamburger

    Neil Hamburger

    S D Green peels back the tuxedo and gets an earful — about celebrities living in cardboard boxes, Carrot Top pooing into a trunk, and even a little bit about Hamburger‘s new album, Neil Hamburger Sings Country Winners.

  • Kid Koala

    Kid Koala

    Kid Koala has two hands, four turntables, and one awesome show. S D Green endures the weird dancing for a trip down Moon River.

  • Tokyo Police Club

    Tokyo Police Club

    In the time it takes you to read this review, Tokyo Police Club can play an entire set of high-energy indie rock. S D Green tries to keep up with all the brevity.

  • Ultra Music Festival

    Ultra Music Festival

    Ultra Music Festival celebrates a decade as dance music’s spiritual soul. S D Green makes the pilgrimage to Miami, is lost, and then found.

  • Aesop Rock

    Aesop Rock

    Despite the obvious pitfalls of playing on a giant Transformer in a “backyard”, Aesop Rocks this block party-esque show at Orlando’s Anti-Pop Music Festival. S D Green was there to drink the $2.50 PBRs.

  • Caribou

    Caribou

    Caribou come to Florida to repay Canada’s debt for bands like Loverboy. S D Green was there to bear witness and soak up all the positive karma from this Canadian music renaissance.

  • Akron/Family

    Akron/Family

    Akron/Family bring their travelling circus to Orlando. They say “Love is Simple” but on this night, as S D Green found, their music proved anythying but.

  • Sam Rivers and the Rivbea Orchestra

    Sam Rivers and the Rivbea Orchestra

    Will’s Pub may have closed, but Sam Rivers’ monthly jazz workshop finds new life at the Plaza Theatre. S D Green finally figures out who put the bop in the bop-she-bop-she-bop.

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